Python Tutorial for Beginners 2: Strings – Working with Textual Data

///Python Tutorial for Beginners 2: Strings – Working with Textual Data

Python Tutorial for Beginners 2: Strings – Working with Textual Data

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In this Python Beginner Tutorial, we will begin learning about the string data type. Strings allow us to work with textual data in Python. We will be going over different ways to format strings, and also a lot of useful string methods. Let’s get started.

The code from this video can be found at:

Watch the full Python Beginner Series here:

Slicing Video:
String Formatting Video:

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By |2019-09-29T23:05:37+00:00September 29th, 2019|Python Video Tutorials|45 Comments

45 Comments

  1. Michael O September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    For those of us who learn by doing, would you consider making assignments for these videos that encourages the use of the tips you taught?

  2. Web Application Guide September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Thank you corey !!

  3. Mohit Tripathy September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Can't you speak slowly

  4. Tom September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    is there any Pyhton book that you would recomend us??

  5. Joji joy September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    I dont understand why people would downvote his tutorial. Its a terrific work. Thanks Corey

  6. Aniketh Sahu September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Great work Corey, you have explained strings very clear and in a simplified way coz usually most of online tutorials skip some important functions especially that format one.

  7. QA hars September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    @corey, do you also teach automation with python (from testing perspective)? I really enjoy your python videos. You are AWESOME 🙂 Is there any channel you recommend for testing automation with python? Thank You.

  8. Tasadduq Hussain September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    you r really great explainer. love your videos

  9. Surayyaah M September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    New youtubers let's grow together 🙂

  10. Surayyaah M September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    New youtubers let's grow together 🙂

  11. Miguelitos Falcon September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Just want to ask, index from hello is 0 to 4 right so does it mean it should be print(message[0:4])?

  12. Sarthak V September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Which IDE did you used?

  13. Srujana Chavala September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Can I use Jupyter lab ?

  14. christophe michaels September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Watching while listening to Air on a G String by J.S. Bach

  15. Kairos Klean September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    I'm completely new to programming and l have review a lot of online python tutorials. Corey are the best teacher so far. Thanks.

  16. Alex Sage September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    This is better than going to college!!!

  17. Jolly Mishra September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Its awesome. Very helpful and can follow end to end

  18. siddhant salunke September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Bro which software u r using for video making and voice

  19. Meghana Sk September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Hi Corey!
    Your way of explaining is awesome and has lot of clarity in it..
    Thank you so much..

  20. Patryk Kędzierski September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Great Work

  21. محمد September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    15:35 i learned in "Python the hard way" book that we can use %s %d %r or %f it looks like this:
    print("%s, %s. Welcome!" % (greeting, name))
    but your way looks more neat actually.
    thanks 4 video

  22. Dennis Will September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Very good tutorial for people strarting out. The F string was also something I never used before and it's great! Thanks a lot.

  23. SnakeKittenTiger Enough Said September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Python is an easy to learn, powerful programming language. It has efficient high-level data structures and a simple but effective approach to object-oriented programming. Python’s elegant syntax and dynamic typing, together with its interpreted nature, make it an ideal language for scripting and rapid application development in many areas on most platforms.

    The Python interpreter and the extensive standard library are freely available in source or binary form for all major platforms from the Python Web site, https://www.python.org/, and may be freely distributed. The same site also contains distributions of and pointers to many free third party Python modules, programs and tools, and additional documentation.

    The Python interpreter is easily extended with new functions and data types implemented in C or C++ (or other languages callable from C). Python is also suitable as an extension language for customizable applications.

    This tutorial introduces the reader informally to the basic concepts and features of the Python language and system. It helps to have a Python interpreter handy for hands-on experience, but all examples are self-contained, so the tutorial can be read off-line as well.

    For a description of standard objects and modules, see The Python Standard Library. The Python Language Reference gives a more formal definition of the language. To write extensions in C or C++, read Extending and Embedding the Python Interpreter and Python/C API Reference Manual. There are also several books covering Python in depth.

    This tutorial does not attempt to be comprehensive and cover every single feature, or even every commonly used feature. Instead, it introduces many of Python’s most noteworthy features, and will give you a good idea of the language’s flavor and style. After reading it, you will be able to read and write Python modules and programs, and you will be ready to learn more about the various Python library modules described in The Python Standard Library.

  24. TheDragonApollo September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Is this in sublime? or idle?

  25. Hongtae Kim September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    The best teacher ever! No one can be compared to Corey!

  26. Mona Gulapa September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    You should be given an award because you are helping so many learners for free. I am so grateful.

  27. SPACEUPHORIA September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Einstein='infinity'

    # Old Fashioned/Old School Formatted String Example:

    # Title-Case is .title() Upper-Case is .upper() Lower-Case is .lower()

    print('the universe is {}'.format(Einstein).title())

    print('the universe is {}'.format(Einstein).lower())

    print('the universe is {}'.format(Einstein).upper())

    # New Formatted String Example:

    print(f'the universe is {Einstein}'.title())
    print(f'the universe is {Einstein}'.lower())
    print(f'the universe is {Einstein}'.upper())

  28. SPACEUPHORIA September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    # [::-1] can make print text and strings come out backwards

    # .title()
    makes all the words become (title-case) words.
    '''Note: .title() works with reversed text, but it doesn't reverse the first letters of any words.
    The last letters of any words become (title-case), .title[::-1] instead. Example: Backwards is Sdrawkcab '''

    print('this message is backwards. can you read "racecar"?'[::-1].title())

    reverse='this message is backwards. can you read "racecar"?'[::-1].title()

    print(reverse)

  29. SPACEUPHORIA September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    a='Apples','oranges','Tom Thumb','But Python programming is so much better for you.'

    # None Formatted String Example:

    print('My name is '+(a[2])+'. '+(a[0])+' are good for you. So are '+(a[1])+'. '+(a[3]))

    # Old Fashioned/Old School Formatted String Example:

    '''Note: This format example is still around, but (f') format is now the standard in Python 3'''

    print('My name is {}. {} are good for you. So are {}. {}'.format(a[2],a[0],a[1],a[3]))

    # New Formatted String Example:

    print(f'My name is {a[2]}. {a[0]} are good for you. So are {a[1]}. {a[3]}')

    a,b,c,d='Apples','oranges','Tom Thumb','But Python programming is so much better for you.'

    # None Formatted String Example:

    print('My name is '+(c)+'. '+(a)+' are good for you. So are '+(b)+'. '+(d))

    # Old Fashioned/Old School Formatted String Example:

    '''Note: This format example is still around, but (f') format is now the standard in Python 3'''

    print('My name is {}. {} are good for you. So are {}. {}'.format(c,a,b,d))

    # New Formatted String Example:

    print(f'My name is {c}. {a} are good for you. So are {b}. {d}')

  30. Huseyin Akman September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    I was also watching udemy or sth, the guy explained the same things in 2 chapter that you explained in 2 mins, very useful videos. Thanks Corey !!

  31. ss bola September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    thank you very much for absolute clarity…

  32. Tanaz Moradi September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Very efficient and useful. After a long survey of python learning materials and classes I am so happy to find this channel.

  33. Mr Dare September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    If i only discovered you sooner
    screw Udemy , i'm really loving your teaching style so informative and comfortable with no eeh….ahhh.
    Thank you and YT

  34. Jonathan September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    why is my f turning yellow when I'm trying to use the new f string method? Might it be i didn't install it right?

  35. shahid nasim September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    string replacement topic is totally skipped by corey becs this uis a very important topic in python why u cannot replaced string with new values Most Fundamental type in Python are Immutable object

    numbers string and Tuples

    Mutable Object include

    list Dictionaries other object depending upon thoer implementation and variable reference subject this is a kind of misleading to the user

  36. Archana Vaideeswaran September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Great content, very very helpful video 🙂 Really loved the way you explain things. Thank you so much Corey!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  37. Ethan Richardson September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    what platform is this? or what are you using to run python?

  38. maadcobra September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Sir, you are awesome! Thank you for your time and expertise.

  39. Stocke September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    No build system 🙁

  40. Vuzino September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    How do you text wrap the script build run output text?

  41. Tariq Shabir Bhatti September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    thanks, I am taking advantage from your tutorial..

  42. pragnesh parmar September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Hello, Thanks a lot.
    would you please let me know what to understand from below. I am not getting that.

    "lower(self, /)"

    Return a copy of the string converted to lowercase.

  43. saipranav addanki September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Really awesome!!

  44. Sundar Pandey September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Great instructor.

  45. Steven Burt September 29, 2019 at 11:05 pm - Reply

    Thank you so much for this series! I am devouring as much as fast as I can, and loving it.

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